Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Super Star Children's Book Review: Green Green, A Community Gardening Story

Welcome to the monthly children’s book review feature with a focus on diverse books here at Bird Meets Worm! My team of reviewers—Cara Chow, Denise Holmes, Joan Charles, Sharon Calle—and I are so excited to be championing books celebrating everything from gender diversity, people of color, the LGBTQ community to ethnic, cultural and religious minorities, people with disabilities and developmental challenges to controversial topics, unique family situations and anything and everything I did not include. It is to say we take a rightfully board view of diversity! We aim to shine a light on books that bring both familiar experiences to those who do not often see themselves represented in books and new experiences to those looking to expand their worldview. Here at Bird Meets Worm we believe in the power of story to build empathy and thus a better world for you and me and everyone. Look for a new review on the second Wednesday of every month.



Green Green, A Community Gardening Story
By Marie Lamba and Baldev Lamba • Illustrated by Sonia Sánchez
Picture Book (ages 2-5) • 32 pages
Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux • 2017
ISBN 978-0-37-432797-2

Green Green, A Community Gardening Story is a picture book close to my heart. I am lucky enough to live in an urban city that recognizes the need for community gardens. My daughter and I have a garden plot in our neighborhood, where it is has been wonderful to see the plants grow and neighbors come together. So, needless to say, I was excited when I discovered this book.

The story opens with a family, who moves from the country to a big, urban city. A cast of diverse children in the neighborhood, start to notice their city developing up around them. Green spaces are becoming smaller, and empty lots are filling up with garbage. The children take matters into their own hands and start cleaning up one of the lots. With help from the adults, they start cleaning, digging and soon have a space for planting.

Written as a poetic narrative, Green Green shows how children can change their own world and bring people together by doing something as simple as building a garden for their neighbors to share. The message is powerful—it inspires community and fosters a love for cultivating our natural environment, even in a big urban city.

The back matter of the book provides additional information for readers about how to create their own gardens and make spaces that attract pollinaters, like bees and butterflies. 
Green Green will give the reader an open invitation to talk about their community, the environment and how to care for our world.

Buy this book:




Reviewed by: Denise Holmes

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